Monday, 19 June 2017

Lately, I've been...

Hello dear friends,
I feel like I always promise to post here more often, but then a whole week flies away without me even noticing it. I have so many half-written articles and reviews in my concepts but not so much of an impeller to finish them. It's especially difficult during summer. I love the season, but I tend to be very melancholic at this time, and so most of the days I am kind of stuck in this weird day dreaming that makes me sad and sort of happy at the same time. I reminisce about the sweet old times when I was but a little girl playing in the garden of our prior house where we don't live anymore. And that makes me remember the people who used to be part of our lives but are no more. And then I realize how I am getting older, which impel me to think about my life and so on. It's like this strange circle of thoughts that comes every year and because of it it's quite difficult for me to read. Soon after opening a book I find myself in another world, without knowing how to get back. I don't know if it's the unbearebly hot weather or the soothing essence of levander which our garden is so full of, but the summer season always makes my life seem quite bizarre. Do you sometimes feel this way, too?
I was about to write a review on Anne of Avonlea today, but since my thoughts weren't gathered enough for that, I thought I would only update you guys a little bit about what I've been doing and reading lately. So I've finished Tuck Everlasting by Natalie Babbit recently, and it was really fantastic book that I am sorry I haven't read earlier. I am definitely planning on writing a book review on it soon, so stay tuned for that. I've been also watching the Gilmore Girls reunion, which I still don't know how I felt about it. I liked it, but at the same time I thoght they should've just let it be, you know. But I guess I am glad they filmed it anyway. Then I also watched a couple of my favourite movies inspired by Nicholas Sparks' novels, just to get to the right summer mode. And I've already picked up the first book from my Summer Reading List, which is Persuasion by Jane Austen. I added some new leather bound books (which you can see in the last picture) to my shelves and bought a new case for my phone that I am absolutely obsessed with. And that's about everything, I think.
Okay guys, I wish you all a beautiful start of the new week. And I'll be back soon with another post. Till then, have a lovely time and let me know what are you doing/reading currently...

Monday, 12 June 2017

The Inheritance

Author: Louisa May Alcott
Publisher: Penguin Classics
Publishing date: 1998
Pages: 208


The story follows young Italian girl Edith Adelon whose parents died when she was but a little child. She had endured many sorrows before an English gentleman took mercy on her and gave her home among his family. Edith is very beautiful but for her poor and friendless lot, she often finds herself abandoned by others and her heart suffers from the deficite of love. But one day Edith learns a big secret that could change everything, had she decided to share it with others...

"By gentle words and silent acts of kindness, he had won her reverence and her trust, which now had deepened into woman's truest, purest love."

Do you remember the book that Jo March writes in Little Women? Well, this is the one. I was so excited when I found out about the existence of The Inheritance, and I bought it as soon as possible. Now that I have read it, I have to admit it was a little bit of a dissapointment. Do not get me wrong, it was really nice story and quite well written, considering how young Loisa May Alcott had been when she wrote it. But I just haven't recognize her in the book at all. It was ever so much different from my beloved Little Women. I could see her being influenced by gothic romance novels, and for some reason it just didn't feel natural. I felt like all of the characters were too black and white, and our main heroine was that repentant type of a person who always puts others afore her, whom I really am not the biggest fan of. Also, I was a little bit frustrated about some words that Loisa May Alcott repetitively used, even though it really wasn't necessary. She just kept saying how noble and gentle the heart of Edith was, and at some point is started to feel rather compulsory. I am genuinely sad that I cannot add The Inheritance to my all time favourite books, among which Little Women has the most special a place, but that is how I truly felt about this book. At the same time, though, it was really fascinating to read the very first novel from Louisa May Alcott's quill. And I am really glad I had a chance to see her journey from her debut novel to the bestseller of a book that is Little Women. When I overlook the previously mentioned flaws, I would say The Inheritance is still a sweet little story that I would recommend to all passionate and deeply romantic souls...

Rating: 3/5

Sunday, 11 June 2017

"A library is never complete. That’s the joy of it. We are always seeking one more book to add to our collection."

Hello dear readers,
after quite a long time I am here again with another book haul. In this post I am going to show you all of the books that I've acquired since March. As you may know I celebrated my birthday at the end of the March, so most of the books were actually given to me as presents or were bought from my birthday money. I have quite a few pretty amazing books here and I am extremely excited to read them all hopefully soon. I especially adore the new illustrated edition of Neverwhere by Neil Gaiman, which probably my favourite book of his. But without further ado, let's get started...

  • Rilke - This is a collection of poetry by Rainer Maria Rilke. It's published by Everyman's Library Pocket Poets. I am in love with the delicate design of these editions and I would like to collect more of them in the future. Their spines look incredibly beautiful when shelved together. These little poetry books are also really comfortable to hold during reading. Plus they are compeling me to read poetry a little bit more, which is just great...
  • Rebecca by Daphne du Maurier - I read this book in Czech translation at the end of the summer last year, but I have to say that I didn't enjoy it as much as I wanted to in my native language. So I bought it in English in hope of enjoying it more in an original language...
  • The Lie Tree by Frances Hardinge - This book was very popular in The Notting Hill Bookshop when I was working there. And I wanted to read it ever since then, so I am glad I finally added it to my collection. Especially in this gorgeous edition with illustartions by Chris Riddell. Hopefully I can soon find time to sit down and devour it...
  • Neverwhere by Neil Gaiman - I absolutely adore Neil Gaiman as an author and as I said Neverwhere is my all time favourite book by him. So of course, I absolutely could not pass this amazing new edition of it when in bookshop. I simply can't wait to re-read the story...
  • Pride & Prejudice and Persuasion by Jane Austen - Both of these books were given to me by my parents. And I absolutely love their intricated design. They are so lovely and feel great in my hands. I especially adore the copy of Persuasion that has an adorable portrait of Jane Austen on the back flap, as you can see in the picture down below. Doesn't she look amazingly cute...?
  • Caraval by Stephanie Garber - This was kind of an impulsive buy, for everybody seem to talk about this book at the moment. And since I've heard some really great things about it, I am really excited to read it...
  • Beauty and The Beast and Other Classic Fairy Tales - This book was a present to myself because why not. I love fairy tales, and so this beautifully bound book surely couldn't be missing in my home library...
  • The Grisha Trilogy by Leigh Bardugo - In the my February book haul I mentioned Six of Crows and how I wanted to read The Grisha trilogy first. So I finally bought it to be able to read the books in a chronological order...

Saturday, 3 June 2017

My Summer Reading List

I know that summer hasn't officially started yet, but for me it already has when I switched from May to June in my calendar. I am excited for the upcoming three months of warm weather, filled with long evenings spent in our garden with some splendid book to read and delicious food to eat. Even though I have to go to work, thanks to our garden I have this feeling as if I was on a holiday. Having your own garden is a real tremendous thing, especially when the days are so incredibly hot, and I am ever so much grateful for it. Although I am kind of bad at sticking to my TBR lists, I love making them, and so I put together books that I would really like to read this summer. And in this post I am going to share them with you. Of course I left a little bit of place for some other books, too, such as Sarah Dessen's novels for the book club and some books that I was keeping my eye on to purchase soon. But the following books I am hoping to read at any rate. So wish me luck. And don't forget to tell me what books are on your current TBR pile...

  • The Secret Garden by Frances Hodgson Burnett - I can't believe I still haven't read this book, considering how much I adored A Little Princess. I heard some opininons about The Secret Garden being even better, so I am really looking forward to finally get into it...
  • Persuasion - I believe that one should read Jane Austen in every season. I choose Persuasion, for a big part of it is set on Lyme beach. The atmosphere is a bit melancholic, which I also think is rather fitting for reading during warm sunsets...
  • My Jane Austen Summer by Cindy Jones - You guys know how much I love retellings of Jane Austen, so of course I couldn't do without one in my summer stack of books. I am really looking forward to read this one, and so I hope it won't let me down...
  • Marina by Monica Dickens - I've heard so many nice things about this book and it's quite often compared to I Caprure the Castle by Dodie Smith, which is one of my favourite books, so I can't wait to read it. Also, Monica Dickens is a distant relative of Charles Dickens, so I believe it'll be fascinating to read a book from her...
  • See Me by Nicholas Sparks - Reading Nicholas Sparks' books every summer is almost a tradition for me. And I've been meaning to read this one since it came out two years ago. I am positive that it'll be worth the long waiting...
  • The Shell Seekers by Rosamunde Pilcher - I watch the movie adaptations of Rosamunde Pilcher's works all the time. I love their settings and atmosphere. Plus they always make me somehow blithe and happy. The funny thing is, though, that I have yet to read an actuall book by her. The Shell Seekers was chosen as one of the Top 100 BBC Best Books, so I am expecting it to be really good...
  • East of Eden by John Steinbeck - I also want to read some epic classic story this summer and I think that East of Eden might be just the one. I've wanted to read it ever since I heard Kerstin Stewart mention it as a favourite book of hers. It must've been at least eight years ago, but I kept it in my mind all the time. And I believe now is the time for me to finally read it...

Thursday, 1 June 2017

Sarah Dessen Book Club #4| Lock & Key

Author: Sarah Dessen
Publisher: Penguin Books
Publishing date: 2009
Pages: 448


Ruby is used to being on her own all the time. Her mother neglets her from her early childhood, which is why Ruby builds figurative walls around herself and is carefull not to let anybody in. And she is doing just fine, but then her mother disappears and Ruby is supposed to live with her sister, whom she hasn't seen in years. It's when Ruby finds herself in a completely different environment, when she starts to open herself up to new possibilities. Will she be able to forgive her mother and give herself a chance to love people again...?

"We can't expect everybody to be there for us, all at once.
So it's a lucky thing that really, all you need is someone."

What I usually seek in Sarah Dessen's books is simply comfort. Her stories, more than anything, produce the welcoming feeling of not being alone, which a fittingly chosen book can provide you with. I absolutely adore her writing style, which I could recognize anywhere now, even though every single book of hers is different in its own atmosphere. I am a reader who likes to dwell on blue moods and every now and then I like to read something imbedded with a little bit of melancholy. Though it must be a perfectly balanced with an good amount of optimism, so that way I can almost have tears in my eyes but feel happy in my heart. It's kind of hard to explain and it's even harder to find in books. But Sarah Dessen surely knows how to attain this kind of feeling in her stories, which is why I like her so much.

"Look, the point is there's no way to be a hundred percent sure about anyone or anything. So you're left with a choice. Either hope for the best or just expect the worst."

During reading Lock & Key I felt exactly that way, like I was happy and sad at the same time. I love when I have a chance to ponder about life while reading a book that gives me the subjects to think about. I found lots of things I had in common with Ruby and it was really inspiring to see her change so much throughout the book. From taciturn person expecting the worst at any rate she became confident and loving girl, able to hope for better in people around her and especially in herself. Although I would say that this book was kind of slow going compared to the other Sarah Dessen's novels, I would highly recommend it. The story centered around family and friendship and also finding your own place in the world, which is something we all deal with every day...

Rating: 4/5